?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
13 January 2012 @ 09:19 pm
Guadalajara, day 2  
Word count: 9802 | Since last entry: 163

After another fabulous breakfast, we walked downtown toward the Museo de la Ciudad (City Museum) with stops at the Templo Expiatorio (a lovely church whose spire is completely done in stained glass, also featuring the Delta-Winged Queen of Heaven), a bakery, and some weird-ass sculptures of creatures with turtle bodies, twelve-foot tentacles, and baby heads. The museum told us a bit of Guadalajara history, though the text of the exhibits was written in more complex language than the House of the Dogs and thus was harder for me to understand.

We had lunch at La Chata (as seen on Rudy Maxa's PBS TV show, though we didn't realize this until we arrived) where we split the "house special platter," then went to catch a #706 express bus to Tlaquepaque, but when a #707 came by Kate changed her mind and said "okay, we're going to Tonalá instead." On the way I kind of panicked, because as I tracked our progress using the Maps app on my phone, the bus (for which we had nothing resembling a route map) didn't seem to be heading anywhere near Tonalá, in fact it was heading off into the wilds of nowhere. Then I discovered that there are at least three and possibly as many as five towns and localities called Tonalá in this vicinity, and though we were not heading for the one Google Maps found for me, we were heading right for the one that Kate wanted.

It wasn't a market day in Tonalá (we had avoided that deliberately, because it's jammed on market day) but for this reason many of the shops were closed. Nonetheless, we had a good time browsing many small shops selling handicrafts, furniture, and art. Curiously, we saw no postcards, T-shirts, or any of the other usual tourist kitch at all. Then we visited the ceramics museum (where we saw an exhibit of tiles showing various concepts of the Nahual, the mythical totem animal of Tonalá; amazingly detailed ceramic sculptures; and dozens of ceramic masks from the annual ceremony of St. Santiago Whips the Indigenous Peoples Into Submission Day -- you can't make this shit up) and the Regional Museum (a tiny place with a small exhibit of ceramics including a bunch of interesting funeral urns).

After a brief stop for some kiwi-strawberry iced tea, we caught a bus to Tlaquepaque for dinner. But on the way, Kate checked her guidebook and discovered that two of the things she wanted to see there would be closed by the time we got there, so we just stayed on the bus until it got back to Guadalajara. Had dinner at the 9 Corners Bierria, yummy carne asada al carbon and barbacoa, then caught another bus back to the B&B, where I wrote up my notes for the day and enough words of fiction to satisfy my new year's resolution. No promises about whether or not it's going to be worth keeping...

Brain dead now. G'night!

 
 
 
Intelligentrix: Travelintelligentrix on January 14th, 2012 05:16 am (UTC)
I'm really enjoying seeing Mexico through your eyes. I think it would be enormous fun to travel with you guys!
Kate Schaeferkate_schaefer on January 14th, 2012 05:22 am (UTC)
This is awesomely fun to follow as you guys go along. Not quite as much fun as actually travelling with you, but plenty fun even so.
Deldel_c on January 15th, 2012 10:40 am (UTC)
English villages used to suffer from the "five little places all named Tonalá" problem, so they acquired affixes that, like surnames or nicknames, distinguished them from their neighbours. Two famous ones are Tonalá Magna and Tonalá Parva, meaning "Big Tonalá" and "Little Tonalá"; others were Tonalá Levine, "the Tonalá near the big house of the wealthy Levine family", and Tonalá St. Mary, "the Tonalá whose church is St. Mary's".

(churches also used to need affixes to distinguish themselves other nearby churches dedicated to the same saint, but as far as I know nobody ever combined the two things into an ever-increasing string of affixes, thank goodness)

I'm surprised this isn't used more often in science fiction and fantasy.